In September 1978, a paint scraper worth 15 cents was dropped into the torpedo launcher of the US nuclear submarine USS Swordfish, jamming the loading piston in its cylinder. When divers failed to free the piston, the sub had to be drydocked and repaired at a staggering cost of 171,000$ . en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS…
The original code names for the British beaches on D-Day were: Gold, Sword, Jelly and Band as in Goldfish, Swordfish, Jellyfish and Bandfish. Churchill disapproved of the name "Jelly" and renamed it "Juno". Band beach was not invaded; instead the troops landed on Sword. youtube.com/watch?v=5z-Cj…
A fisherman in Florida hooked a swordfish so big that it dragged his boat for 20 miles and fought for eight hours before he could pull it in. It turned out to be the biggest swordfish ever caught in Florida waters. tampabay.com/florida/2019…
The code names for the beaches to be taken by UK forces on D-Day were named after types of fish: Goldfish, Swordfish and Jellyfish, abbreviated to Gold, Sword and Jelly. Churchill "disapproved of the name Jelly for a beach on which so many men might die", and so changed the name to Juno. wikipedia.org/wiki/Juno_B…
The scientific name for the swordfish is Xiphias gladius. Xiphias is Greek for "sword", while Gladius is Latin for "sword". It's scientific name is "Sword sword". wikipedia.org/wiki/Swordf…
Deep sea exploration vehicle Alvin was once attacked by a swordfish 2000 ft below the surface. The swordfish, with sword stuck in Alvin's skin, was brought to the surface with the sub. The crew then cooked it for dinner. whoi.edu/page.do?pid=1073…
One of the submersibles used to dive the Titanic was attacked by a swordfish which got trapped in it's skin causing it to make an emergency surface. They then cooked it for dinner smithsonianmag.com/smart-…
On July 6, 1967, the Alvin Submersible was attacked by a swordfish, which became lodged in the skin of the sub. The crew made an emergency surface, recovered the fish, and ate it for dinner. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSV…
One of the submersibles used to dive the Titanic was attacked by a swordfish which got trapped in it's skin causing it to make an emergency surface. They then cooked it for dinner en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/D…
The swordfish has a species name "Xiphias gladius" which derives from the Greek (xiphos, "sword") and from Latin gladius ("sword") which is basically just Sword Sword en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swo…
The deep diving submarine Alvin was attacked by a swordfish at 2000 feet below the surface. It became trapped in the Alvin's skin, which was forced to quickly surface. The swordfish was then detached and eaten for dinner. whoi.edu/page.do?pid=1073…
Swordfish can heat up their eyes in order to hunt better newscientist.com/article/…
During the Battle of Saipan, plague-infested fleas were intended to be used against American combatants. However, the Japanese submarine carrying the fleas was sunk by the American submarine Swordfish off Chichi Jima wikipedia.org/wiki/Operat…
An extinct species of dolphin had a sword like a swordfish, and possibly hunted like one too en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eur…
Certain fish such as the swordfish, can give you mercury poisoning en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mer…
Swordfish heat their eyes in cold water to improve vision and help catch prey. nature.com/news/2005/0501…
That, during WWII, the Russians used a biplane on the Eastern Front that was so slow, German planes couldn't target it without potentially stalling. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pol…
Biplanes where used in WW2 and helped destroy the Bismarck, the largest warship of the time. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fai…
A colossal squid has the largest eyes in the animal kingdom, With the largest recorded eye measuring to 27 cm (11 in) in diameter, with a 9 cm (3.5 in) pupil. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Col…
John Travolta was only paid $150k for his role in Pulp Fiction (1994)

While it's actually a lot of money, it's just pennies compared to his other big hits: $150k is only 2.5% of the $6M he got paid for Get Shorty (1995) and 0.75% of the $20M he got paid for Swordfish (2001).

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