The metric system is "the preferred system of weights and measures for U.S. trade and commerce" in the USA (Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988) and that US Customary Units (e.g. foot, mile, pound, quart) have actually been defined in terms of their metric counterparts since 1893. nist.gov/system/files/doc…
The word 'bus' is actually short for 'omnibus' meaning "To contain many things" and didn't originate until the early 19th century en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus
Today I learned of the 'The man on the Clapham omnibus', a legal term derived in England to describe a hypothetical and ordinary person. The man on the Clapham omnibus is a reasonably educated, intelligent but nondescript person, against whom the defendant's conduct can be measured. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The…
The term "Bus" is short for "Omnibus," which was actually a reference to "Omnes Omnibus," which was the name of the hatter shop located next to the first bus station, which was in turn a Latin pun on the name of the owner, OmnΓ¨s. secure.wikimedia.org/wiki…
The word "bus" is a shortened form of the Latin word "omnibus" which means "for all" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus…
The ancient Roman Senate had an issue with "riders" on their bills, called omnibus bills, which they later outlawed en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sen…
The word "bus" comes from a hat shop called OmnΓ¨s Omnibus which was next to one of the first ever bus stops. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus…
Dr. Seuss wrote and illustrated a series of books about boners, including Boners, More Boners, Still More Boners, and Prize Boners, which were later compiled into the anthologies The Pocket Book of Boners and The Omnibus Boners. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The…
The word "bus" comes from a sign on a building of a hat maker near an omnibus (public carriage) stop that said "Omnes Omnibus" which is Latin for "All in all". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus…
The word bus (motor vehicle) is a clipped version of the Latin word omnibus, meaning "for all" en.wiktionary.org/wiki/om…
"bus" is short for "omnibus dictionary.reference.com/…
In 1908, Rolex founder Hans Wilsdorf came up with the name Rolex when, one morning while riding on the upper deck of a horse-drawn omnibus, a genie whispered "Rolex" in his ear (under 1908, second bullet). rolex.com/about-rolex/rol…
Today I learned of the man on the Clapham omnibus rule, a hypothetical reasonable person, used by the courts in English law where it is necessary to decide whether a party has acted as a reasonable person would. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The…
NASA's 50-year project to research gravity and prove Einstein's theory of gravity was nearly abandoned after its research probe's instruments were off. It was saved by the donations of Turki Al Saud, a Saudi Prince whom holds a PHD in Aeronautics and Astronautics nature.com/news/2011/1105…
Today I learned of the WWI Christmas Truce, where during Christmas 1914, some French, German and British soldiers miraculously met in no man's land to exchange gifts, food and conversation. A soccer game even broke out while fighting still continued elsewhere down the trenches. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chr…
The famed Pony Express only lasted 18 months, when it was made obsolete by the the transcontinental telegraph en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pon…
Today I learned about 'The Bowmen', a fictional story by Arthur Machen written in 1914 about British forces being rescued in WWI from the oncoming German troops by a host of Angels. Although the story was fictional many British soldiers claimed it was true and the 'saviours' were known as the Angels of Mons. fantastic-writers-and-the…
The phrase "a moron in a hurry" is often used in law courts to reject allegations of trademark infringement; Apple Inc used it to reject the Beatles record company Apple Corps' claim en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_m…

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