Danny DeVito did the dub for his role as the titular character in The Lorax (2012) in Russian, German, Italian, Catalan, and Castilian Spanish, despite not speaking any of those languages deadline.com/2017/05/cann…
Philippines is the only former Spanish colony that doesn't speak Spanish/Castilian. globalvoices.org/2014/12/…
, the majority of Spanish-speakers call their language "castellano" (Castilian) not "espaΓ±ol" (Spanish) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nam…
Antonio Banderas provided the voice for the main character in the English, Italian, Latin American Spanish, Castilian Spanish and Catalan versions of the movie Puss in Boots. hollywoodreporter.com/new…
Latin America doesn't have the "Castilian lisp" because most Spanish emigrants were from Western Spain, where the pronunciation hadn't yet spread. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cas…
The Spanish Language's proper name is "Castilian" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cas…
In Castilian (or Spanish) the word "Adios" is a combination of the words "A" and "Dios" literally meaning "To God" merriam-webster.com/dicti…
AntΓ³nio de Saldanha was a Castilian-Portuguese 16th-century captain, and the first European to set anchor in Table Bay (South Africa) and made the first recorded ascent of Table Mountain. Saldanhabaai was also named after him. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ant…
Spaniards speak with a lisp due to early Spanish King (Castilian Lisp) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pho…
Basque (a language spoken near the Spain/France border) is a language isolate; not only is it NOT a Romance language, it's not even an Indo-European language. It is the only surviving Pre-Indo-European language in Western Europe. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bas…
The United States has the 4th largest native Spanish-speaking population in the world, and has more native speakers than Spain en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spa…
Danny Devito in the Russian language version of the movie Π’he Lorax voices his character in Russian. He does this as well as other languages in their respective versions, including Spanish, Italian, English, Castillian and others. youtube.com/watch?v=jW7Db…
Christopher Columbus could speak seven different languages.

From Is That a Fish in Your Ear?: Translation and the Meaning of Everything by David Bellos:

"In the late Middle Ages, the situation was quite similar in many parts of Europe. Traders and poets, sailors and adventurers moved overland and around the inland seas picking up and often mixing more or less distantly relate languages as they went, and only the most thoughtful of them every wondered whether they were speaking different 'languages' ore just adapting to local peculiarities. The great explorer Christopher Columbus provides an unusually well-documented case of the intercomprehensibility and interchangeability of European tongues in the late Middle Ages. He wrote notes in the margins of his copy of Pliny in what we now recognize as an early form of Italian, but he used typically Portuguese place-names--such as Cuba--to label his discoveries in the New World. He wrote his official correspondence in Castilian Spanish but used Latin for the precious journal he kept of his voyages. He made a 'secret' copy of the journal in Greek, however, and he also must have known enough Hebrew to use the astronomical tables of Abraham Zacuto, which allowed him to predict a lunar eclipse and impress the indigenous people he encountered in the Caribbean. He must have been familiar with lingua franca--a contact language made of simplified Arabic syntax and a vocabulary taken mostly from Italian and Spanish, used by Mediterranean sailors and traders from the Middle Ages to the dawn of the nineteenth century--because he borrowed a few characteristic words from it when writing in Castilian and Italian."

Bolding is my own. Reading on Kindle, so I don't know the exact page number, but you can find that excerpt at location 137-150.

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