About the Transcontinental Airmail Route. A series of huge, bright yellow, illuminated, concrete arrows, built in the 1920s. They were every 10 miles and followed to enable night flying. A lot of these concrete arrows, now cracked and aged, still exist across America. cntraveler.com/stories/20…
Today I learned about aerograms - pre-stamped, foldable, extra thin paper for international airmail en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aer…
In the 1920s, the US Postal Service established the Transcontinental Airway System, which consisted of 1500 light beacons and giant arrows on the ground every 10 miles from New York to San Francisco, allowing pilots delivering airmail to find their way at night and in bad weather. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tra…
There are giant concrete arrows dotted across America leftover from the days of the first airmail routes. Pilots used them to navigate. doobybrain.com/2013/08/20…
There's a series of large concrete arrows pointing the way across the US, once used to guide airmail planes messynessychic.com/2013/1…
The first instance of airmail was back in 1859 via balloon wired.com/2010/08/0817us-…
There are enormous concrete arrows across USA for Airmail planes to point direction for the next stop off to deliver mail. outdoorrevival.com/instan…
Airmail pilots in the 1920's used a network of 70-foot concrete arrows to navigate cross country flights. These arrows are still around today. blm.gov/wo/st/en/res/Educ…
Fred Wiseman was the 1st person to deliver airmail in the world, only delivering a small handful of items. airmailpioneers.org/conte…
In 1923, Congress approved a line of 70-foot-long yellow concrete arrows snaking 2,629-miles across the country from New York to San Francisco. These arrows were used as navigational aids for the Postal Service to transport airmail. thedailybeast.com/article…
Juan Trippe's company was the first to offer an airmail service over the pacific ocean in One Trip en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jua…
The nickname for the fledgling US Airmail service was "The Suicide Club" due to the high number of crashes. postalmuseum.si.edu/exhib…
In 1924, the Postal Service installed giant concrete arrows that guided early airmail pilots across the U.S. sometimes-interesting.com…
In the 1920s, the subsidy for carrying airmail was more than the cost of sending it, so airlines would send massive amounts of junk mail to boost their own profits. airforce-magazine.com/Mag…
The first transcontinental night airmail service was established at Hadley Field. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Had…
In the early days of US Airmail service, giant concrete arrows and beacon towers, spaced every 10 miles from NYC to San Francisco, were used to help pilots navigate cross country. messynessychic.com/2013/1…
In 1924, the Postal Service installed giant concrete arrows that guided early airmail pilots across the U.S. sometimes-interesting.com…
World's first official airmail flight was piloted by Henri Pequet, who flew with 6,500 letters a distance of 13 km (8.1 mi) from Allahabad to Naini - the nearest station on the Bombay-Calcutta line, on February 18, 1911 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air…
USPS classifies magnets as being hazardous if they interfere with aircraft instruments and/or measure 0.00525 gauss at 15 feet (for airmail). pe.usps.com/text/dmm300/6…
The reason why the postbox outside the Manchester (UK) Museum of Science & Industry is blue, is because blue was a special colour used for airmail postboxes in the 1930's. There are only two blue postboxes in the UK. geograph.org.uk/photo/239…

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